Articles added to Trove

Apologies in advance for a post David tells me is a bit technical.

Trove, the National Library of Australia’s discovery service, has just been enhanced to include articles.  The data comes from  Gale for international journals and Informit for journals indexed for the Australian Public Affairs and Information Service (APAIS).

This means that a search on the Western Australian potter Eileen Keys now retrieves not only Eileen Keys : ceramics, 1950-1986 and Eileen Keys interviewed by Barbara Blackman, but also an article by Eileen Keys herself in Pottery in Australia, v.21, Nov/​ Dec 1982, p.22-25, and Teddy Letham’s obituary published in Pottery in Australia, v.31, no.4, Summer 1992, pp.38-39.

I can’t view either of the Eileen Keys articles online as the articles are too early to have been digitised. However, I can access Gordon Fould’s article on Stephen Bowers in Craft Arts International, v.48, 2000, pp.46-50 through my State Library of NSW membership.

I didn’t realise at first that we are not seeing the most recent articles. The National Library outsourced the hosting of its APAIS data to Informit in the mid 1990s and there are business interests to be protected, so Trove only includes APAIS records for works published up to 2005. In addition, while APAIS has operated in paper form since 1948, the database only includes articles from 1978 onwards.

The coverage of individual titles in APAIS can also vary. Ceramics: Art and Perception and Craft Arts International are both included on the list of titles indexed selectively for APAIS. Surprisingly, Pottery in Australia / The Journal of Australian Ceramics and Craft Australia are  not on the list at all. There are records in the database but the coverage is much sparser than I had realised. 

Across all titles, editorials, news items, book reviews, images of new work and, especially, advertisements are unlikely to have been indexed. Also, the names of potters mentioned in articles may not be included in the indexing data unless they are the main subject. In the longer term, the Library may seek funding to digitise whole issues using the same approach as for newspapers. This would generate full-text indexes of the entire content. In the meantime, having free access to the APAIS data from 1978-2005 is a major leap forward. In particular, I can at last bookmark articles and share them with others!

Postscript

Here are some more interesting facts:

  • Ebsco’s Academic Search Premier, which I can access through the State Library of NSW, is the most comprehensive source I have found for articles from Ceramics: Art and Perception (1,637 hits from 1997-2011) and Craft Arts International (1,713 hits from 1994-2011).
  • Google Scholar gives the best results for Pottery in Australia / The Journal of Australian Ceramics, with around 850 hits from 1995-2008), compared to 215 in Informit  from 1982-2011 and 116 in Trove from 1982-2005.
  • Informit / Trove both give the best results for Craft Australia with 163 hits from 1977-1988.
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2 comments

  1. you can create a list on Trove and add all the articles you find to it, I’ve been doing this with my family history but there are so many other possibilities for varied interests

    1. Hi Erica, yes, I’ve been thinking of doing this. At the moment, I’m using delicious for my Australian pottery bookmarks, but it was sold to uTube recently and I’m beginning to feel I’d like my data in safer hands. What’s good about delicious is that it gives me a URL for my tags that I can cite elsewhere, but I’ll be in trouble if the URL changes. Perhaps I could create a Trove list for every potter. Hmm….

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